…storytime, books, apps, and ideas

If you ever want to bring a circusI’ve been away for a month, but now I’ve returned to a new pile of books. I have a few to share with you. First off, a book that would be fun to share at a class visit to the library. This is the time of year that lots of classes take field trips to the library, so pull out your best librarian voice and read If You Ever Want to Bring a Circus to the Library, Don’t! The main character’s antics will have kids laughing, and the bright cartoon illustrations will keep their attention. You’ll need to practise shouting BABOOMBA! for real effect, though.

In the complete opposite direction, The Way Home in the Night is a quite, introspective title that would be good for bedtime or night themed storytimes. A young rabbit is carried home by Mother Rabbit, Way home in the nightand describes what they see as they walk along in the city. A simple premise made big by the lush illustrations. Animals baking pies, having a birthday party, and reading on the couch are completely natural in the capable hands of Miyakoshi. Look for the evident pencil strokes, the thick paper, and the use of shading to depict light and shadows in this quite, contemplative book. Pairs well with The House in the Night, the 2009 Caldecott winner.

A new Jerry Pinkney book is always cause for celebration, and the publication of The Three Billy Goats Gruff means you can get out the party balloons and streamers. You may ask, “Do we really need another version of this?” and the answer is yes. Yes we do, we need this one.  As Three Billy Goats Gruffexpected, Pinkney’s illustrations are lush, funny, nearly realistic, and full of movement. The storytelling is spot on. Be sure to look closely at the end pages and read the author’s note, though, because the storytelling doesn’t end when the last page is turned. The bookmaking here is top-notch, including the ‘secret cover”. This book would make a great classroom discussion book as well as a fun one to share in storytime. Add it to your Pinkney collection!

For a light romp into vegetarianism, add T.Veg: The Story of a Carrot-crunching Dinosaur to your next dino storytime. The bright illustrations are wild and eye-catching, the rhyme, which is occasionally forceT. Vegd, is jaunty and will make a fun read-aloud. The message, that it is ok to be different (or ok to be a vegetarian in a world of meat-eaters), can be taken on several levels. Kids may giggle at the thought of a dinosaur that likes carrot cake, and they will cheer as T. Veg saves the day.

 

favorite colorFOR TEACHERS:

A couple that teachers may want to try in classrooms include What’s Your Favorite Color? — a collection of short essays by well-known illustrators which could easily be used as a mentor text, or in art class as a model for thinking about how to use color. Pair it with What’s Your Favorite Animal? .

And last: this book from Lemony Snicket, Goldfish Ghost, might work well in upper elementary classes. Anyone who has had a goldfish as a pet will instantly recognize the floating white shape portrayed by Lisa Brown’s ink & watercolor illustration. In this book, the adventures of a goldfish whogoldfish ghost has just died will bring up discussion of friendship, looking for a place to be, and, naturally, death. The ending is a comfort, as (SPOILER ALERT!) goldfish ghost finds just the company he’s been seeking. What could be a morbid little book is handled quite well, with light touches of humour, and a feeling of quietness.  Keep your readers on their toes and pair Goldfish Ghost with this couple’s 29 myths on the Swinster pharmacy.

 

A big pile of books to share this time! Here we go…

Dad and the Dinosaur by Gennifer Choldenko, illustrated by Dan Santat.Dad and the Dinosaur

Nicholas, afraid of the dark, has a little toy dinosaur that gives him strength. He sees his dad as brave and bigger than life. When the dino goes missing, his confidence is gone, until Dad helps him find it and lets him know it is ok to have the dino as a helper. Santat’s signature illustrations fit just right with the story, and looking for a dinosaur on every page will be a fun task for young readers. Delightful choice for Father’s Day!

We’re all wonders by R.J. Palacio

What does it mean to be different? Here’s a book that celebrates the ordinary and the extra-ordinary. We ARE all wonders, indeed. A simple-to-read book that asks the reader to look with kindness, and see what they can see. Nice pairing with Happy Dreamer (see below).

I lost my sock! : a matching mystery / by P.J. Roberts

Need a quick book with rhymes and matching for your next storytime? This one is not terribly original, but it is fun, and storytime kids will likely be in on the joke well before Fox is.

I am (not) Scared by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant

These bear-like creatures are back (You are (not) Small) and this time, they show us differing perspectives on what is scary, and what is not. A fun choice for storytime or for opening a discussion on what is scary.

Up!: How FamiliUp! es Around the World Carry Their Little Ones / by Susan Hughes, illustrated by Ashley Barton

Upsy-daisy baby! How do babies get carried? In a sling, in a parka, on a hip, in a pack – diverse families from around the world show the young reader that all babies get carried by those who love and care for them. Cut-paper collage illustration fit the tone nicely. Good for toddler storytimes and one-on-one exploration.

Places to Be by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Renata Liwska  Places to be

This book has such wondrous vocabulary, in a simple setting: beastly, vibrant, brave, sneaky, acrobatic – and the illustrations, made with “brush and ink and digital hocus-pocus” take those words to a new level. Two little bear siblings take us through a range of activities, emotions, and places. A winner for quiet storytimes, bedtime, or sharing in a small setting.

Happy Dreamer by Peter H. Reynolds

Do you know a child who always seems to have their head in the clouds? Who sees things in their own way? Who daydreams, creates, and plays? This book helps to remind us that there are many kids of dreamers, and there’s nothing wrong with dreaming. Reynolds’ cartoon-style drawings help the dreamers leap off the page, and soar to their own tunes. Full of great vocabulary and plenty to dream about.

People of the SeaFor Teachers:

The People of the Sea by Donald Uluadluak, illustrated by Mike Motz

This story, based on an Inuit legend and told by an Inuit storyteller, is a great addition to First Nations studies. The story feels very much like a storyteller sitting right there with you telling the tale, and the illustrations help to put the story in the setting. There is plenty of extra information about the teller and the book includes a pronunciation guide, making this an excellent mentor text for writing a personal tale.

 

 

 

 

 

I raided the New Book cart and found a few treasures. If you want even more, follow me on Twitter @annavalley and search the #PictureBookPile hashtag. Here we go…..

Nanette's BaguetteNanette’s baguette / words and pictures by Mo Willems  Hyperion Books, 2016

Rhymes abound in this silly story of a wee froggie sent to fetch bread for the evening meal. Nanette forgets the baguette when she meets her friends (one of them has a clarinet).  Once she actually gets the bread, another mishap befalls the hunk of gluten. In expectedly humorous Mo Willems style, all is well in the end. Or is it? Perfect for learning new vocabulary and reinforcing phonological awareness.

Chirri & Chirra / Kaya Doi ; translated from the Japanese by Yuki Kaneko. Enchanted Lion Books, 2016

Twin girls travel through the woods, stopping for tea, lunch, and finally the forest hotel. With soft coloured pencil drawings that are reminiscent of  Virginia Lee Burton’s “The Little House”, this book is a fun romp with woodland creatures.

Tidy / Emily Gravett. Two Hoots, 2016Chirri & chirra

Nothing wrong with tidying up now and then, but when things get out of hand, this over-zealous cleaning badger has to rethink his obsession. Beautifully designed and illustrated, this one is a real charmer.

Daydreaming / Mark Tatulli. Roaring Brook Press, 2016.

Henry is a daydreamer. His fantasy life is rich, diving into boxes of cereal and sliding into the alphabet. A fun twist at the end of this book makes it all worth the wait. As this is mostly wordless, may not be a first choice for group storytimes, but makes a fine book to share one-on-one.

Have yTidyou seen my trumpet? / written by Michael Escoffier ; illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo. Enchanted Lion Books, 2016 

Fun word play and a fine little surprise at the end, combined with whimsical illustrations make this a great choice. Teachers will enjoy getting kids to look closely at the pages, which reveal the word clues in red ink. For example, “Who is playing Frisbee?” shows a bee riding on a Frisbee. (The word bee is in red.) There’s plenty of humour and great vocabulary for young readers.

cover- town is by the seaTown is by the Sea  by Joanne Schwartz, illustrated by Sydney Smith, Groundwood Books, 2017

Occasionally, I have to devote a spot to just one book. I was lucky to get an early copy of this one, and as I consider a new Sydney Smith book an occasion, here we go!

Open the sparkling ocean cover to coal-black end pages, and right away, you feel the dichotomy of this book. Town is by the Sea is at once a love-song and a heartbreaker. See that pensive young boy on the cover? He will be your guide through a day in a coal-mining town circa 1950’s. He will take you on a journey from dawn to sunset, in town and into the mines, via Schwartz’ nearly-pastoral poetry. And yet— how can life be idealized when your father goes under the sea each day to dig coal? And when you know you will grow up to do the same? So “Town” is not idealized, yet to this young boy, it is ideal, it is real, “that’s the way it goes”.

The book tugs at the heartstrings. Many a Nova Scotian will recognize this town, even if they did not grow up in coal country. They will recognize the small-town feel, the sparkle of the ocean, the slow pace of life, the neighbourly characters, the deep sense of family. Though it has a feel of nostalgia, children will be able to appreciate the story, and it will be a welcome addition to classrooms for historical fiction study. With the re-opening of the Donkin Mine in Cape Breton, this book is the perfect way to open discussions bound to arise around safety and environmental issues. The timing of the book’s release is spot-on. boy at window with curtain

Sydney Smith’s art brings it all home with a thick ink line and an amazing ability to transform watercolour into light. Somehow he is able to make a curtain flap in the breeze, flowers bend as a bicycle rides by, and the on the next page, take us deep underground in a coal tunnel. The bright sun of the town above is in stark contrast to the coal-mining pages, which are created by filling a double spread nearly all the way with dark swathes of grey and black. At the bottom of the page, Smith gives us a small line of air, a seam for the miners to hunch over and light with their headlamps. Just when you cannot take this oppressive dark, you turn the page and go back to ample white space, to boys running, swinging, looking out at the sea. And then, back underground.

coal mineThe pacing of this book is impeccable. The design includes full-bleed pages, panels, blocks of time passing, and wordless spreads. Both the text and the art breathe with life, and in sync with one another. The book is out on April 1, 2017  — book launch scheduled for March 25 in Halifax! Highly recommended.

February is African Heritage month, and a great time to celebrate diverse books! For your reading pleasure, I’ve put together a booklist HERE. 

Here are a few books you really should NOT miss:

radiantRadiant Child won the Caldecott Medal this year. The book is well named, as it is absolutely radiant. The art sings, jumps, and prances about as the book tells the story of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Young artists will be inspired by the story of this vibrant young man.

One of my favourites of this year was Freedom in Congo Square, which I wrote about in this blog post. It got some Caldecott love as well, winning a silver medal. up-home

Looking for something a little closer to home? Try Up Home, by Shauntay Grant, a story about the memories of beautiful summer visits to North Preston.

Get inspired by Misty Copeland, ballerina, in Firebird. The illustrations leap off the page and grab the reader, and the story of this young ballerina will make you want to dance.

If soccer (or poetry) is more your thing, try Kwame Alexander’s Booked, the lyrical, jaunty story of a boy who bookedloves soccer, but is forced to read the dictionary by his father.

My booklist has a whole whack of great books – learn some history, get to know a new character, or just find a good book to read as you celebrate the rich culture of African Heritage Month!

I’ve had the John Lennon /Yoko Ono song “Give Peace a Chance” song stuck in my head for days—and here’s why. In preparation for moving our Administrative Office, we are weeding. Weeding old files, and also the books we have to move. As I go through the shelves and pull books that are old and worn and not being used, I keep hearing that song, only I am singing ‘All we are saying, is give THESE a chance.” These referring to books. I see so many amazing books that are languishing on the shelves that have not been checked out in years. Sodahlia, instead of weeding those, I am asking you to give them a chance. If something here sounds good to you, place a hold on it! Borrow it and see what you think. Give it a chance. This is a great way to discover books—place a hold on a book that strikes your fancy. Just grab your library card, click on a book link below, and place a hold. We will transport it to your local branch for pick up, and you return it there, too. Easy peasy.  Here goes (these are in no particular order):

Dahlia by Barbara McClintock:

A story of a little girl who gets a doll, but she’d rather make mud pies and climb trees. She finds out that her doll enjoys these activities, too. I love the message that toys can be what you make them, and just because a doll has frills and lace, doesn’t mean she has to sit around looking pretty and nothing else. And what that message says in general.

may-i-bringMay I bring a Friend? By Beatrice Schenk de Regniers

This one was published in 1964, and won the Caldecott Medal.  It is a book I never tire of reading. The rhyme is jaunty and fun, and the illustrations are joyful. Invite this book over for tea.

Several of Wallace Edwards’ books are sitting on the shelf. A classroom could do a whole Wallace Edwards study with the books sitting there.  His books are so much fun to browse—and he has a way of really getting the reader to monkey-businessstop, think, and look carefully. Teachers, get your students excited about idioms with Monkey Business or The Cat’s Pajamas. Solve visual puzzles with The Painted Circus. There you go, lesson planned!

Need some writing prompts? If your children (or students) need some writing practise, borrow one of Doreen Cronin’s “Diary” books, such as Diary of a Fly or Diary of a Worm. Kids will chuckle as they read these, and then you can get them to write their own “diary” – find a bug or animal they would like to take on.

book-womanMaybe this is just a personal one, but That Book Woman by Heather Henson is just sitting there, waiting for some love. This book is about a librarian on a pack horse who travels through the Appalachian Mountains in the 1930’s to bring books to families. Now that is dedication. Kind of like the Bookmobile driving through the back roads of Nova Scotia.

deerHere’s one that makes me happy every time I look at it: Deer Dancer by Mary Lyn Ray. I love the art, the movement, the colours.  The story of a girl who is learning ballet, but loves nature and so learns more about dance from that is one that really pulls at my heart. Maybe you know someone who loves nature and dance as well. Share this little gem with them.

I could go on and on, and maybe I will in another post. My challenge to you is to find a book in our catalogue that looks interesting, Place a hold! Bring it to your library. Take it home and give it a chance.

snowt-dayAs the snow piles up, as winter peeks around the corner, I start to think of snowy days. A classic snow book is The Snowy Day, by Ezra Jack Keats. This book won the 1963 Caldecott Medal, and has been a childhood favourite for years. Not only is it a a universal snow experience, it has diverse characters and can be found in nearly every library. So, in homage to The Snowy Day, and the first day of Winter, let’s look at some more snowy books.

Beth Krommes won a Caldecott for her art in The House in the Night, and she could be noticed by the committee again this year for the art in her latest book, Before Morning. The book is a short poem, an invocation of snow. Anyone who has ever wished for a snow day will love this book. The poetry of Joyce Sidman is beautifully illustrated in scratchboard and watercolour. I always admire artists that can make white look so enticing, which is exactly what Krommes does in this little gem. before

If you’ve ever been snowed in for days, Blizzard by John Rocco will bring it all right back. From the joy of no school to the stir-crazy house to running out of milk, this book captures a snowstorm perfectly. Don’t miss the centerfold map of the boy on snowshoes around his neighbourhood.

How white is white? Explore the many colours of winter in Arctic White by Danna Smith. Illustrator Lee White does a fine job of capturing the many shades of white as well as the blues and greens of winter skies.

If you want something light and interactive, try Bunny Slopes by Claudia Rueda. Tilt the book so the rabbit can ski downhill, shake it to make snow fall. Fans of  Tap the Magic Tree and Press Here will enjoy this bunnywintery romp.

In Peter McCarty’s First Snow, cousin Pedro has to be convinced that snow is fun. He doesn’t like the cold! We all have a friend or relative like this, so it is fun to see how the snow (and his cousins) changes his attitude.

Enjoy the snow photography and learn some facts about the water cycle in Best in Snow, by April Pulley Sayre. Teachers, add this one to your classroom reading for the winter! best-snow

If adorable little woodland creatures are what you are looking for, you’ll love Waiting for Snow. Those little critters are just so dang cute that I had to mention this one.

A gentle song of winter settles over the lovely world in Hawksley Workman’s Almost a Full Moon. Grab a cup of cocoa and snuggle up while you pore over the illustrations by Jensine Eckwall.

full-moonHow does all that snow get moved? By a snowplow, of course, Get inside the head of Supertruck, the super hero that gets the streets cleared so the other trucks can do their jobs. Your truck-loving youngsters will be happy to see this in the pile of snow books.

Take a close look at snowflakes with Snowflake Bentley. This is the Caldecott Medal winner about the man who first photographed snowflake crystals. Not only is it a fascinating story, the artwork will wow you as well.shackleton

Explore the deep snowy winter in Shackleton’s Journey by William Grill. If your readers love poring over minutiae,  this book will thrill them. Diagrams of sleds, what the team packed to take with them, and how they planned for their long trip are all drawn in fine detail. This one is a beauty!

Any I missed? What are your favourite wintery books? Tell me in the comments!