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Posts tagged ‘picture books’

Picture Book Month – Tattooable books, 2016

Kid-lit tattoosimg_1951 are a Thing. I know, I have one. The Caldecott 2015 Committee has several tattoo stories. It is not unusual to spot a picture-book tattoo at ALA conferences. Last year in Orlando, at least 3 people at my table had tattoos from books, including this one from Miss Mary Daisycakes.  So, I started thinking about what might be the most tattooable books of 2016. I have my own favs, but I also thought I would ask the experts (aka, the other members of the 2015 Caldecott Committee who got tattoos).

Roger Kelly chose the little monkey from The Airport Book by Lisa Brown, Roaring Brook Press. I can definitely see this charismatic character as a tattoo, and I can see why Roger chose it. Besides being cute, this little monkey serves to move the story forward in a visual manner. Monkey provides tension and story, relevant to a young reader,  in a book that would otherwise just be about taking an airplane  trip. roger-airport

adrienne-hat-1Adrienne Furness chose the “shifty-eyed turtle” from Jon Klassen’s We Found A Hat;  Candlewick Press. She says “every single time I look at this book, which has been a lot, he makes me laugh.” I agree with Adrienne; those eyes do so much to tell the story and show us the complicated emotions of the turtle characters.

Sharon McKellar weighed in with a book I was not very familiar with, but have since come to appreciate. The art is something to pore over, and would certainly be lovely as a tattoo. Sharon chose the foxes from 123 Dream by Kim Krans; Random House. sharon-123-dreamI wonder if these two baby foxes appeal to her mother-of-twins heart. That mama fox is fiercely watching over those kits. Sharon says she’d put this on the back of her shoulder. If  you don’t know this book, take a look at it. Beautiful pen and ink renderings of flora and fauna.

Ok, now for my choices. I couldn’t pick just one. Good thing I don’t live near a tattoo shop like Black & Blue in San Francisco (where Roger, Sharon, Victoria Stapleton, and I got our Caldetatts). Because I’d likely have very little ink-free skin if I did! My first choice would be a large back piece of the tree dragon from The Night Gardener by The Fan Brothers; Schuster Books for Young Readers. I love the detail and all the leaves. This tattoo would probably hurt like the dickens because in order for it to be effective, it would have to be a wholimg_4319e back piece, maybe with those tree trunks wrapping around the waist. This whole book is gorgeous, but this dragon really stopped me in my tracks.

Next up is a playful choice from Thunder Boy Jr., by Sherman Alexie and illustrated by Yuyi Morales; Little, Brown, and Company. The colours and movement in this book are soimg_5594 appealing, and there are so many little details to look at. This little alligator toy really makes me happy, though, and I would certainly be fine with having it permanently on my skin.

So, do tattooable books make award winners? We will just have to see, won’t we? I certainly think all of these books have amazing illustrations. They all speak to picture-book lovers for some reason. What do you think? Do YOU have a tattooable choice for a book published in 2016? Tell me in the comments!

 

Autumn is… books

Books are falling onto the shelves like leaves from a tree. Or something like that. A whole new crop of good storytime choices await!

A Leaf Can Be… Laura Purdie Salas

It’s nice when a book can work both for storytime and as an informational book,. Young nature lovers could learn much about leaves in this book. Art extensions include leaf rubbings or leaf creations similar to those in Lois Ehlert’s “Leaf Man”. Rich in vocabulary and perfect for autumn storytimes.

Duck Says Don’t – Alison Ritchie

Bossy Duck won’t allow any fun while in charge of the pond;  that makes everyone else leave and go play in the meadow. Duck puts up a sign to welcome them all back, fun included. Use Duck’s signs to play with words – you could make signs around the room, point them out to kids. Have them make their own signs, too!

Jonathan & Martha – Peter Horacek

Two worms meet, tangle, and then become friends. There’s a lesson here, presented in an odd manner, but still fun enough for storytime. Food, sharing, worms, & friendship are themes here. Make it interactive!

Monkey See, Look at Me – Lorena Siminovich

Toddlers will enjoy being in on the joke – a monkey pretends to be other animals. Get them to chime in on the repetitive refrain and increase those talking and vocabulary skills!

Dinosaur Thunder – Marian Dane Bauer

Little brother is afraid of thunder, but not dinosaurs! His fears are tamed by relating it to something he loves. Lots of emotion in the illustrations;  a gentle lesson on fears. Could work in a dinosaur storytime.

Bang Boom Roar – A busy crew of Dinosaurs – Nate Evans

Alliteration and rhyme make this a good choice for sharing. The illustrations are a bit busy, but dino-crazed youngsters will love it.

Dino Football – Lisa Wheeler

Add sports and rhyme to your next dinosaur storytime with this book. Not a lot to the story, just a good old football game, played by lots of dinos, but it will be a hit with a certain crowd.

 Laugh Out Loud Baby – Tony Johnston

Based on the Navajo tradition of the First Laugh Ceremony, this joyful tribute to laughter should give you a reason to LOL. Lots of fun vocabulary in this one.

Monster Mash– David Catrow

Just in time for Halloween—the old song comes to life through detailed monster illustrations which might be a tad scary for the very youngest. Read the book, put on the song, and mash!

Stay Close to Mama – Toni Buzzeo

Twiga the baby giraffe is very curious, and nearly gets into trouble several times because of it. Add a sunny visit to Africa and give your storytimers a rich vocabulary experience with this book.

My Mama Earth – Susan B. Katz

Lovely colors enhance this simple, rhyming tribute. Mama Earth is the focus, but children will likely relate to the Mother aspect more than the environmental one.

A Kiss Means I Love You – Kathryn M. Allen

Large full-color photographs illustrate this toddlerific explanation of talk-free emotions. Get ready to be smooched and hugged after you share this book! Great choice for baby stortytimes, too.

Oh No! – Candace Fleming

Eric Rohmann’s illustrations make this cumulative story come alive. Jungle animals try to escape a hole and are rescued by Elephant. Get the kids to chant along as you read this one, there are plenty of opportunities for it!

Bear Says Thanks– Karma Wilson

Bear is back and this time his woodland pals all bring food to share. Bear has only hospitality and stories to share, and it is, of course, enough. Perfect for Thanksgiving or even Christmas storytimes.

New Storytime Books!

Summer is winding down, but the new books are still coming in! Here are a few of note that will help in planning your Fall Storytime sessions.

Dog Gone by Leeza HernandezA very short rhyming story of a dog lost, and then found. Good for toddler time!

Duck Sock Hop by Jane Kohuth – Rhyming ducks put on socks and dance about. Toddlers will gain plenty of phonemic awareness with this silly little romp. Colorful and should keep their attention.

Huff and Puff by Claudia Rueda – Minimalist “Three Pigs” story with lots of interactive opportunities. Increase those TALKing skills by asking lots of questions as you share this one.

Machines go to work in the city by William Low – Lift the large flap to reveal the whole machine. A fun addition to vehicle storytimes.

One Two, That’s My Shoe by Alison Murray – Short, but nicely illustrated counting book featuring a dog and his girl. Add a bit of math skills to storytime with this one.

Pussycat, Pussycat by Dan Bar-el – The old familiar rhyme is extended for a far-reaching journey that ends right back at home. Use it when you need to add some rhymes to your next CAT storytime.

Shakespeare’s Seasons by Miriam Weiner – Never miss an opportunity to add Shakespeare to storytime! The Bard is still the boss, so share a few pages to add some sophisticated poetry to your next “Seasons” storytime.

Wild About You by Judy Sierra – As in Wild About Books, Sierra presents a rhyming story, set in a zoo. This time there are zoo babies and a slight story that will add a bit of jazz to your storytime.

Storytime Books

This week we had a whole stack of nice picture books arrive! Here are some of the best:

 

All by Myself by Geraldine Collet

A short little tale of independence that toddlers will eat right up, just like the little chicks in the story.

 

Little Lamb, Have you any Wool? by Isabel Minhos Martins

Combine with Mac Barnett’s Extra Yarn and Woolbur by Helakoski for a very woolly storytime. Great for discussions about where yarn comes from, too. Bring in a ball of wool for craft time!

 

Who Made this Cake? by Chihiro Nakagawa

Construction crew builds a cake? Yes! Pair this with Emberley’s The Red Hen for a fun cooking-themed storytime. Make construction-paper cakes and let the kids decorate with collage materials and markers for an easy craft extension.

Odd Dog by Claudia Boldt

If you have a group that will sit for a slightly longer story, share this tale of sharing. The cheerful retro-style illustrations are just right for this story.

Animal Masquerade by Marianne Dubuc

A whole parade of disguised animals happily scamper across the pages of this little gem. Lots of new vocabulary as you meet the silly members if this wee animal story.  Kids will have fun trying to guess what the animals will be disguised as next.

Old Robert and the Sea-Silly Cats by Barbara Joosse

Just a good old-fashioned story to share! So many picture books are one-concept, simplistic idea books, but this one is actually a story. Who can resist dancing cats and a grouchy old sea captain? Find a fun sea-shanty to sing after you share this book!

Hop Hop Jump by Jarrett Krosoczka

A wild romp for active storytimes, this book will have kids flapping their arms and wiggling their toes.

The Cat in the Rhinestone Suit by John Carter Cash

Rhymes and new vocabulary abound in this very silly story of a Wild West-style conflict between a cat and a snake.

I Spy Under the Sea by Edward Gibbs

Cut-away holes reveal a secret in this oceanic counting and guessing book. Develop those talking skills by asking children to predict what is on the next page.

 

 

New books for storytime

Sorry folks, I know it has been a while, but Summer Reading Club and conference prep is eating up all my time! Here are some new books to share..

Zoom Rocket Zoom by Margaret Mayo
Great informational book for preschoolers. Zoom into space with cheerfully colored astronauts and learn how rockets, space shuttles, and more work. Perfect addition to the transportation storytime!

Split! Splat! By Amy Gibson
Lots of silliness in this book, which features rain, puddles, and mud. Take advantage of the rhymes to reinforce those letter sounds, and get the kids up to pretend splash and stomp.

Night Knight by Owen Davey
This book could simply be described as a bedtime adventure in shades of orange and brown, but those obsessed with dragons and castles will see the fun here. You may have to spend lots of time exploring the illustrations.

Suppose You Meet a Dinosaur by Judy Sierra
This book could easily have been a didactic tome for preschoolers. Instead, Judy Sierra has made manners fun and illustrator Tim Bowers has made the dino into a pink-spectacled T-Rex with attitude. Lots of opportunities for your storytime crowd to TALK on every page as they answer questions. Similar in feel to Yolen’s “How do Dinosaurs” books.

Demolition by Sally Sutton
Do you know any boys that squeal with delight when they see a bulldozer or a backhoe? This book will make them very happy. Play with the rhymes and the onomatopoeia for a super-fun (and noisy) storytime.

  Dancing with the Dinosaurs by Jane Clarke
This TV-show spin-off gives you the opportunity to get up and dance. It is silly fun, and    a  cute way to add some PLAY into your storytime.

 Boy + Bot by Ame Dyckman
Practise your best robot voice and the kids will love this simple story with bright    illustrations. Great for letter ‘B’ day.

Blue Sky by Audrey Wood
Not much of a story, but the illustrations and the concept make great filler and a perfect jumping-off point for some book related art.


Baby Bear Sees Blue by Ashley Wolff
Great for Spring storytimes, as well as nature, colors, and bears. When baby bear sees yellow, it is the warm sun. When he sees green, it is a new leaf. You get the picture. Ask the children to guess the answer before you turn the page, helping to develop those early prediction skills.

You are a Lion by Taeeun Yoon
Add some activity to your storytime with this yoga book. Simple poses and a guessing game make this an easy and fun way to introduce movement.

Mock Caldecott

On Saturday, January 21, I am leading a Mock Caldecott workhop and mock election. I have a big list of books to take with me. Some of these I really don’t think have a chance at the medal, but I have gathered books that have gotten good reviews, books that I personally have enjoyed and think are the best of the year, and books that other Mock Elections have noticed. Here’s my rather long list — some are hopefully in a box that is being shipped as I write, and I will have them tomorrow or Friday. Here it is!

CALDECOTT POSSIBLES – 2012

A Ball for Daisy – Chris Raschka
All the Water in the World – George Ella Lyon
The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse- Eric Carle
Balloons over Broadway – Melissa Sweet
Bee & Bird – Craig Frazier
Blackout – John Rocco
Blue Chicken – Deborah Freedman
Bone Dog – Eric Rohman
Brother Sun, Sister Moon – Katherine Paterson
Bumble Ardy – Sendak
Dot – Intriago
Drawing from memory– Allen Say
The Gingerbread Man Loose in the School – Laura Murray
Grandpa Green – Lane Smith
The Great Migration– Eloise Greenfield
Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans – Kadir Nelson
House that Baba Built– Ed Young
I Want My Hat Back – Jon Klassen
If I Never Forever Endeavour by Holly Meade
If You Lived Here – Giles Laroche
Jonathan and the Big Blue Boat- Philip Stead
Leap Back Home to me– Thompson
Little White Rabbit – Kevin Henkes
The Man in the Moon – William Joyce
Me…Jane – Patrick McDonnell
Naamah and the Ark at Night – Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Neville– Norman Juster
Orani: My Father’s Village – Claire A. Nivola
Perfect Square – Michael Hall
Red Sled – Lita Judge
Stars – Marla Frazee
Subway Story- Julia Sarcone-Roach
Tweak, Tweak – Eve Bunting
Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star– Jerry Pinkney
Where’s Walrus? – Stephen Savage

What do YOU think will win? Are any of these your favourites? Discuss amongst yourselves.

New books for storytimes

Here are some new books that have crossed my path recently (all available from AVRL):

Bubble Gum, Bubble Gum –by Lisa Wheeler.  Rhymes, and a fun, bouncy text with lots of animals getting stuck in gum.   Practise this one before you turn it loose on storytime, because it is certainly a tongue twister.

The Gingerbread Man loose in the School – by Laura Murray.  A funny rhyming story in which a gingerbread man gets left behind by the class that made him. Might work nicely with a Gingerbread Houses craft.

Cows to the Rescue — by John Himmelman .  It’s off to the county fair, and Farmer Greenstalk needs some help. Cows to the Rescue! Cows get the farmer and his crew out of several jams. Have all the kids MOO on the “Cows to the Rescue” pages for great rowdy fun (do a few practise MOOS first). Of course, you have to shout out “Cows to the Rescue!” in your best Superhero voice.

Ernest the Moose Who Doesn’t Fit – by Catherine Rayner.   Ernest is too big for the book, but his clever friend chipmunk finds a way to fix that. With a fold-out page that shows the solution, this is a great story about cooperation and friendship. Would make a nice companion to Mo Willems’ pop-up, Big Frog can’t fit in.

Bear on Chairs – by Shirley Parenteau.  Plenty of rhymes in this story of finding a way to share. Line up some small kid chairs and put as many bears as you can get (or have) on the chairs to extend this story.

Who Has These Feet?  By Laura Hulbert – add a bit of science to storytime. Lots of funky animal feet and a one-sentence explanation of why the animal has that kind of feet. Pair with Pete the Cat by Eric Litwin, Shoe-la-la! By Karen Beaumont, and  One foot two feet : an exceptional counting book  by Peter Maloney for a foot-filled storytime!

Thesaurus Rex by Laya Steinberg – Most of your preschoolers are not going to have a clue what a thesaurus is, but their parents will get the joke and they will learn some new vocabulary in this rollicking rhyme about a little dinosaur who has a descriptive kind of day. Brightly colored and good for sharing.

999 Tadpoles by Ken Kimura – Some exciting moments and a scary adventure for this large frog family, but all ends well as a result of teamwork. The illustrations are really fun, and I could see a frog craft easily extending this.